Is There A Link Between Concussions And Alzheimer's Disease?

A diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease strikes fear and uncertainty not only for the patient but also for their families. The race is on to develop testing and strategies to more accurately predict who is at risk before the symptoms are already apparent.

Research conducted at Boston University School of Medicine points to a connection between traumatic brain injuries and late-onset Alzheimer's Disease in people with pre-existing genetic risk factors. In fact, moderate to severe concussions can even advance deterioration of the brain function.

Their test group included war veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan; some who reported one or more concussions, and others who had no head injuries. MRI imaging measured the thickness of the cerebral cortex. The findings concluded those with severe concussions had cortex thickness in the regions known to exhibit the first signs of memory loss.

Of note also, was the relatively young age of the study participants. Most of the veterans in this group were in their early thirties. This points to the importance of tracking and monitoring any concussion or brain injury, even the ones that do not appear severe. If combined with someone already possessing a genetic risk factor for the disease, long-range problems may develop. For additional information, you can talk to someone about this link between concussions and Alzheimer's Disease.

Of course, concussions are not just a by-product of war. They can happen anywhere to anyone; car accidents, on the job injuries, even sports. If you or someone you love has suffered a concussion and worried about the long-term effects contact us. We are here to help and guide you through any questions or problems you encounter.

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